Facebook Accused Of Violating Seattle Political Ads Law

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg
Facebook Accused Of Violating Seattle Political Ads Law

On Monday, Seattle’s election authority claimed that Mark Zuckerberg’s social networking site, Facebook Inc remains in violation of the city legislation that calls for full disclosure of who gets political election advertisements. It’s an initial effort to control US political ads on the web.




The city wants Facebook to divulge information concerning costs in 2016’s Seattle city elections. Else, it will face fines.

The charges could be as much as $5,000 for every advertising and marketing buy.

Facebook claimed in a statement it had actually sent out the details of the costs of political ads in 2016. It added
that it’s a solid supporter of transparency in political marketing.

However, the city claimed that Facebook’s action does not satisfy its public commitment. The business gave partial investing numbers. But it failed to send copies of advertisements or information about the ads which they targeted.

The uncontrolled way of the US political ads online attracted interest last year after the social networking site claimed that Russians made use of phony names to purchase ads on the social network to attempt to persuade voters ahead of the 2016 political election. But Moscow refutes trying to meddle in the political election of the country.

Federal regulation does not compel online advertisement vendors, like Facebook, to divulge the identity of the customers.

However, the regulation is pending to expand government policies regulating political marketing on TV and radio to cover web ads. Tech companies have introduced strategies to reveal some data willingly.

Last year, Mark Zuckerberg claimed that his company would indeed develop a new requirement for transparency in online political ads.



The 1977 legislation calls for firms that offer political election ads, like radio stations, to keep public books revealing all the names of the purchasers, their payments and exact nature and level of the advertising services provided.

However, the regulation does not cover tech firms, up until a local paper, The Stranger, released a story last year following the Russia accusations asking why.

Seattle corresponded to Facebook and Google and asked them to supply information. They have remained in talks. Last month, Facebook employees met face to face, with the commission staff.

The city stated that it had given Facebook enough time to follow the regulation. Google, on the other hand, requested to be given more time to abide and that demand is still pending.

However, legal specialists claimed that they were not aware of any kind of similar law enforced by the other US states.



Last year, Facebook attempted to make it less complicated to recognize political ads in News Feed. The social media giant introduced a way to for marketers, specifically political candidates, to divulge more details about their advertising initiatives on the system as Facebook looks to control the problems from the US Congress about Russian meddling in the presidential election in 2016.

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Author: Carrie Kaplan

Carrie has the final say and final review of all news stories being published at Launch A Biz. In addition to guiding the team, the direction, and the growth of the news floor, Carrie Kaplan also possesses deep contacts in the world of business and the financial sectors biggest breaking stories. Years of experience on Wall Street guide Carrie’s unique talent for fantastic journalism.

About Carrie Kaplan 5 Articles
Carrie has the final say and final review of all news stories being published at Launch A Biz. In addition to guiding the team, the direction, and the growth of the news floor, Carrie Kaplan also possesses deep contacts in the world of business and the financial sectors biggest breaking stories. Years of experience on Wall Street guide Carrie’s unique talent for fantastic journalism.

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